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Teapot

ca. 1700
Origin: England, Fulham
Overall height: 4 1/2 inches
Stoneware, salt-glazed, white with engobe and iron dip
Museum Purchase
Acc. No. 2011-74,A
Salt-glazed stoneware teapot with engobe. It is of globular-shape with a tapered tubular spout based on a Chinese prototype. The rim, spout tip, and top of the handle are iron-dipped. There is an extra piece of clay applied below the handle and cut to resemble two small pyramids.
Label:This salt-glazed stoneware teapot with engobe is of globular-shape based on a Chinese prototype and possesses a tapered tubular spout. The rim, spout tip, and top of the handle are iron-dipped. There is an extra piece of clay applied below the handle and cut to resemble two small pyramids.

The earliest white stoneware teapot excavated in America was found at the Geddy House site in Williamsburg, Virginia. This teapot of the same form was recovered from a construction trench in Woolwich, England. Both vessels are assigned to John Dwight's Fulham Pottery based on the archaeological evidence for teapots from excavations of that pottery's works. Each has an extra piece of clay applied below the handle and cut to resemble two small pyramids, a detail typical of Fulham wares from this period. Only two other teapots ascribed to Dwight are known. An example with an iron wash covering the upper half of its body similar to the Geddy teapot was excavated in Guilford, Surrey, from a deposit of circa 1702 to 1714. And a toy or miniature teapot identical to the Woolwich example, but only 1 7/8 inches tall, was recovered from the latrine at Boley Hill in Rochester, Kent.
Provenance:Previously in the private collection of Jonathan Horne.
This teapot was recovered from a construction trench in Woolwich, England.