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A New Map of the ENGLISH PLANTATIONS in/ AMERICA./ both Continent and Ilands,/ Shewing their true Situation and distance, from/ England or one with another

1673
Origin: Great Britain, England, London
OH: 26" x OW: 29 3/8" (Framed) Unframed: H: 17 1/2" x W: 21 1/8"
Black and white line engraving with period hand color on laid paper
Museum Purchase
Acc. No. 2000-17
The upper left cartouche reads: "A New Map of the ENGLISH PLANTATIONS in/ AMERICA./ both Continent and Ilands,/ Shewing their true Situation and distance, from/ England or one with another,/ By Robert Morden, at the Atlas. in Cornhill/ nere the Royal Exchange, and William Berry/ at the Atlas. in Corhill/ nere the Royal Exchange, and William Berry/ at the Globe. between York House and the New/ Exchange in the Strand, LONDON."
Label:While Robert Morden and William Berry's A New Map of the English Plantations in America illustrates no territory identified as being inhabited by Natives, the cartouche is decorated solely with depictions of Indians. Several are pictured holding a banner containing the title of the map. Depicting them in this manner subtly suggests that they support or uphold the claim suggested by the title contained within the banner - that the geography illustrated belonged to England.

The majority of cartouches on seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century maps of America contain decorative images of the Native population. By the middle of the eighteenth century, most of the ornamentation used depicted the slave populations.
Provenance:This very rare map was probably the earliest general map of English America of any significance. Jeannette Black describes it as, "One of (the) earliest maps to be published with express intention of representing all the English-American colonies, from Hudson Bay to Guiana." It was also selected to be the general map of the colonies for the famous Blathwayt atlas (map 3).