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Portrait of Ann Blaws Hansford Barraud (Mrs. Philip Barraud) (1760-1836)

ca. 1800
Origin: America, Virginia, Norfolk
OH: 35 in.; OW: 25 in.
Oil on canvas
Museum Purchase, The Friends of Colonial Williamsburg Collections Fund
Acc. No. 2018-208,A&B
A half-length portrait of a young woman with hazel eyes and dark brown hair. She wears a white, high-waisted dress and, over her hair, a white bandeau, both dress and bandeau being edged with lace. A single strand of pearls encircles her neck. Her proper left arm is raised, the elbow bent, with her face resting against her hand. The elbow rests on a table covered with green cloth. Her proper right arm hangs down, her lower arm and hand not shown in the composition. Difficult to discern in the dark background, flowing green drapery occupies the right side of the painting, and to the left, an open door or window reveals a low shrub or tree.
Label:Ann Blaws Hansford Barraud was born in Norfolk, Virginia, in 1760, the daughter of Lewis Hansford, M.D., and Ann Blaws Taylor, a Norfolk widow. On July 23, 1783, she wed Philip Barraud, M.D. Born in Williamsburg, Virginia, in 1757, Barraud had served the cause of independence as a surgeon, probably in a militia unit. In 1799 he was appointed director of the United States Naval Hospital in Norfolk and moved with his family, which included his wife and their young son, Daniel Cary Barraud. In 1805 their daughter Lelia Ann Barraud was born. Ann Hansford Barraud was distinguished among her peers and recognized by later generations for her musical talent. Bound volumes of her piano scores in the Special Collections Department of the Earl Swem Library at the College of William and Mary attest to her talent.

Henry Benbridge likely completed this portrait shortly after the Barraud’s move to Norfolk in 1799. While he is best known for his South Carolina portraits, Benbridge worked for a short period of time in Norfolk, Virginia from about 1800 to 1809.
Provenance:Descended in the family of the subject to Colonial Williamsburg's source.