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Unfinished Sampler by Amanda E. Bookman

1838
Origin: America, South Carolina, Lexington County
OH: 19" OW: 18"
Silk and crinkly silk embroidery threads on a linen ground of 28 wefts by 30 warps per inch (fiber identification by eye)
Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Harold C. Mauney, Jr.
Acc. No. 2010-127
This is an almost square embroidered sampler worked in faded shades of green, blue, gold, tan, and cream silk embroidery threads on a natural-colored linen ground. The sampler has selvages at sides and a 1/8" hem at top and bottom.
The top half of the sampler consists of alphabets and decorative bands:
"A-M" uppercase block alphabet in eyelet stitch
Undulating floral band in cross stitch
"N-X" uppercase block alphabet in eyelet stitch
Band of cross stitch
"YZ" uppercase block alphabet and ampersand in eyelet stitch; "A-L" uppercase block alphabet in double cross stitch
Band of wave in cross stitch
"A-W" uppercase block alphabet in block stitch
Band of Irish stitch
The lower half of the sampler consists of a centered basket of realistically-worked flowers and leaves. To the left of the basket is the signature line and date: "Amanda E. Bookman's/ sampler 1838." To the right of the basket is the inscription: "Taught by Mrs Walker." Vacant areas to the left and right of the basket suggest that the sampler was never completed.
An undulating outer border of stylized flowers encloses the sampler on all four sides.

Stitches: block, cross (over one and two), double cross, eyelet, Irish, knots, outline, straight
Label:The historic town of Lexington, South Carolina, originated in the old Royal township of Saxe Gothe. It was one of eleven townships established in 1735, by the colonial government of King George II to encourage settlement of Backcountry South Carolina. Most of the early settlers were of German and Swiss descent, traveling down the Great Valley road from Pennsylvania, through Virginia, and into the Carolinas. By the time Amanda Bookman created her sampler, Lexington boasted a diverse population of farmers, tradespeople, artisans, millworkers, factory workers, physicians, lawyers, and schoolteachers.

Amanda was probably the daughter of Thomas Bookman, a millwright of Lexington District, South Carolina. Immigrants from Switzerland, the Bookman family first settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, around 1743. By 1750, the family was in Lexington after receiving a land grant from King George II. Amanda tells us on her sampler that she was "Taught by Mrs. Walker," an unidentified needlework instructress presumably teaching in the town of Lexington.

Provenance:The sampler descended to the present-day donors, Mr. and Mrs. Harold C. Mauney, Jr., from Mr. Mauney's mother, Margery Dunklin Heise Mauney, born April 25, 1915 in Columbia, South Carolina. Margery Dunklin Heise Mauney was the daughter of Thomas Alexander Heise (b. 11/6/1881; d. 7/28/1958 in Columbia, South Carolina) and Margery Dunklin (b. 12/5/1885 in Greenville, Alabama; d. 4/24/1967 in Columbia, South Carolina). The sampler is believed to have been made by a family member. At this time no connection has been found to link the family of the samplermaker, Amanda E. Bookman, to the family of Mr. and Mrs. Harold C. Mauney.

History of Samplermaker
Bookman Family (Baughman, Baukman, Bachman, Bockman) in America

The 1800 Census Records for Lexington District, South Carolina noted several alternative spellings of the surname Bookman including "Bachman," "Baukman," and "Bockman." An earlier spelling of the name was "Baughman," which can be traced back to John Jacob Baughman, who was baptized on March 20, 1696, in Schottekin, Parish Elgg, Canton Zurich, Switzerland. Immigrants from Switzerland, the Bookman family first arrived in Philadelphia probably in 1743. The Bookman family settled in Lexington District, South Carolina by 1750 after receiving a Colonial Land Grant from King George II on January 10, 1749 for 200 acres of land in Craven County (Orangeburg District) on the southwest side of the Broad River. (Columbia, SC Archives, microfilm # 0002-005-0004-00407-00). Land deeds for Lexington District indicate that the family was large landowners, buying and selling lots of land throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

The historic town of Lexington, South Carolina originated in the old Royal township of Saxe Gothe. It was one of eleven townships established in 1735 by the Colonial government of King George II to encourage settlement of backcountry South Carolina. Most of the early settlers were of German and Swiss descent, traveling down the Valley Road from Pennsylvania, through Virginia, and into the Carolinas. Major crops of the 18th century included corn, wheat, tobacco, hemp, flax, beeswax, and livestock. In 1785 Lexington County was established, changing the name from Saxe Gothe to Lexington in honor of the Massachusetts Revolutionary War battle. Part of this area became Richland County in 1880.

First generation
John Jacob Baughman (Bookman) baptized 3/20/1696 in Schottekin, Parish Elgg, Canton Zurich, Switzerland
m. Margaretha Schwizler (baptized 12/25/1698 at
ca. 1720 Parish Elgg)
Children: William Jacob; Hans Ulrich; Henrich; Solomon; Susannah; Margaretha; Joachim; Hans Conrad; John; Abraham
Arrived in Philadelphia in 1743 with 8 of their 10 children. (Immigration Index by Filby; list of Swiss immigrants by A. B. Aust) (Note that dates of births of children and arrival date of 1743 are at odds.)
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Second generation
William Jacob Baughman (Bookman) b. 9/1721 Elgg, Switzerland; d. ca. 1778 Harlon Co, KY
m. Anna Christine Von Arenthal
ca. 1749 in Elgg, Switzerland
Children: Rachael Susannah; Robert; Samuel; John; Jemima all born in Orangeburg District, SC

It is unclear whether John Jacob (father) or William Jacob (son) received a Colonial Land Grant from King George II on 1/10/1749. This first grant was for 200 acres of land in Craven County (Orangeburg District) on the southwest side of the Broad River. (Columbia, SC Archives, microfilm # 0002-005-0004-00407-00). This area became known as Lexington County and in 1880 became Richland County.
William Jacob received a Colonial Land Grant from King George III containing 100 acres of land on June 23, 1774. It was in Craven County (later Lexington County, and now Richland County) on a branch of the Broad River called Hollingshead Branch. This is where the Bookman Plantation was located and where William Jacob lived.
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Third generation
Samuel Bookman, Sr. b. 12/5/1766; d. 9/15/1838 in Orangeburg District, SC
m. Jemima Rainey
before 1797
Children: John B.; Jacob Oscar; Thomas T.; Samuel, Jr.; Anna Barbara; Daniel E.; unnamed baby girl; Joseph C.; Jesse; David
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Fourth generation
Thomas T. Bookman b. 1802; d. 1855
m. Sarah (Sallie), maiden name unknown
Children: Amanda E.; Ann J.; Thomas E.; Samuel William; unnamed infant died
Thomas T. and Sarah Bookman are buried in the Bookman Cemetery.
Thomas t. Bookman owned a millwright and operated a gristmill on the Broad River, north of the Bookman Island. In 1993 the site of the millhouse was located with old mill house timbers and the mill's corners stones still to be seen.
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Fifth generation
Amanda E. Bookman b. ca. 1830

Our samplermaker is probably the Amanda E. listed in the household of Thomas Bookman, a 48-year-old millwright appearing in the 1850 Census Record of Lexington District, South Carolina. The 1850 Census Record indicates that Amanda's neighbors were the family of David Bookman, her father's younger brother.

The 1860 Census Records for Lexington District, South Carolina lists Amanda Nobel, age 31, in the home of Nathaniel Noble, 32-year-old laborer, in Long Hollow. It's probable that this is our samplermaker.

Mark(s):"Amanda E. Bookman's/ sampler 1838"
Inscription(s):"Amanda E. Bookman's/ sampler 1838"
"Taught by Mrs Walker"